The 2022 French Presidential Election: Towards a Reinvention of Democratic Processes? / L’élection présidentielle de 2022 : vers une réinvention des processus démocratiques ?

The 2022 French Presidential Election: Towards a Reinvention of Democratic Processes? / L’élection présidentielle de 2022 : vers une réinvention des processus démocratiques ?

Contact: ceccopop@gmail.com

Deadline: Sun, 27 Feb 2022


Event Details

International Conference, Nice, Université Côte d’Azur, EUR CREATES
29-30 June 2022, Centre Universitaire Méditerranéen

 

“Like a thunderclap”. Fifteen years after Lionel Jospin uttered these words, shaken by his defeat in the first round of the 2002 presidential election, they regained their relevance in 2017, when the Socialist Party was almost erased from the map of French politics. Its candidate Benoit Hamon, totalled only 6.35% of the votes cast in the first round, after a selection process of "open primaries" to all citizens.

Emmanuel Macron’s 2017 victory has most often been attributed to a very controlled political communication campaign, combined with the skillful exploitation of a deleterious political context. He was able to bypass the usually indispensable transmission belt: the political party. By creating an ad hoc militant structure (“En Marche”), Emmanuel Macron had succeeded in turning the political spectrum upside down and winning the election. He was notably helped by the team which had contributed, five years earlier, to the victory of François Hollande, by mapping electoral France.

In the fall of 2021, the 2022 French presidential election seems to be placed under the paradoxical sign of certainty and confusion. Barring a huge surprise, Emmanuel Macron appears certain to avoid the fate of his predecessor. His term of office, though burdened by the pandemic linked to COVID-19, should not prevent him from representing himself with chances of a new victory. As for the diffuse atmosphere of confusion, it concerns rather political parties which do not seem to have recovered their capacity to fulfill their role. Six months before the electoral deadline, Anne Hidalgo, the socialist candidate, hardly appears able to put her party in working order again and does not seem to care about truly building up a political program. Likewise, the Republicans are reduced to a sham of "primaries” with an electorate limited to those… who will have kindly paid 30 euros for party membership in time. Finally, "Rassemblement National", which one might have thought dedicated to the service of Marine le Pen, seems to curl up as and when her voting intentions indicated by the polls decline. To add to this confusion, journalist and polemist Eric Zemmour seems to achieve a theoretical breakthrough through an undeclared candidate without precise partisan affiliation. By a succession of calculated provocations, he is surfing in the media agitation of the news television channels and social networks.

As a result, the mechanisms of political communication that accompany electoral processes, pillars of democracy, raise many questions. Shouldn't we get around this belief in the reliability of public opinion polls, which has been questioned for a long time, and even now leads to candidate's withdrawal (François Hollande in 2017) or to the precipitous manufacturing of others?  What role to assign to political parties, especially during an election period? Should they be reinvented in order to resume their mediating function, essential in a society that social networks seem to fragment more and more, the new "hybrid media system" exposed by Andrew Chadwick even putting the cohesion of some countries at stake, like the United States or the United Kingdom?  And how, precisely, to take advantage of the rise of social networks other than by promoting candidates serving only their person or ideas? Aren’t we at the antipodes of our democracies' founding ideas, based on both sides of the Atlantic on principles inherited from an 18th century seeming more and more distant? How to overcome the ease of a generalized recourse to political marketing favouring more and more the personalization of campaigns, forgetting the political ideas, and putting off political programs for arguments based only on the audiovisual charisma of the personalities facing the electorate?

The 2022 French presidential election seems to feed more than ever, beyond its intrinsic result, the problem of reinventing the democratic process, a reality that France seems to share with many other countries presumed to share the same principles, starting with the United States.

This conference will be an opportunity to make a first assessment of the various political communication campaigns that will have been implemented, all along the course of the 2022 presidential election, and to try to infer how to renovate the democratic processes. 

Contributors will be expected to analyze the communication strategies mobilized and their vehicles, from posters to meetings, campaign clips to social networks and other devices invented by political marketing, examining their adequacy to the right realization of the essential process of our democracies, the consultation of the citizen, in France during the major vote, the presidential election.

The questions raised will be the subject of the international conference on comparative political communication to be held in Nice, on June 28 and 29, 2022, at the initiative of the Sic.Lab Méditerranée Research Laboratory of the Université Côte d'Azur (www.siclab.fr) with the help of the Center for Comparative Studies in Political and Public Communication (www.ceccopop.eu). This scientific event will bring together scholars and communication professionals at the "Centre Universitaire Méditerranéen", on the famed Promenade des Anglais.

This conference is organized by Philippe J. Maarek, member of Sic.Lab Méditerranée and Professor at the University of Paris Est Créteil (UPEC), director of CECCOPOP, former president of the Research Sections in Political Communication of IPSA and of IAMCR and by Nicolas Pelissier, Professor at the Université Côte d'Azur, Director of Sic.Lab Méditerranée (UPR 3820), and director of the "Communication and Civilization" book series at L'Harmattan.

The event will be bilingual, French-English. Colleagues wishing to present a paper are invited to send a request to participate before February 27, 2022, to the following email address: ceccopop@gmail.com.

Proposals should include an abstract of 250 to 500 words (one or two pages) and a CV of one page. They will be the subject of a double-blind evaluation by the Scientific Council members.

Scientific Direction and Organization

Philippe J. Maarek, Université Paris Est – UPEC, Sic.Lab. Méditerranée (UPR 3820) and CECCOPOP

Nicolas Pelissier, Université Côte d'Azur et Sic.Lab. Méditerranée (UPR 3820) - https://siclab.fr 
 

Scientific Board

  • Paul Baines, University of Leicester, United Kingdom
  • Camelia Beciu, Université de Bucarest, Roumania
  • Donatella Campus, Università degli studi di Bergamo, Italy
  • Ann Crigler, University of Southern California, USA
  • Eric Dacheux, Université de Clermont Auvergne, France
  • Alex Frame, Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté, Dijon,  France
  • Elizabeth Gardère, Université Bordeaux-Montaigne, France
  • Gilles Gauthier, Université de Laval, Canada
  • Lutz Hagen, Université Technique de Dresde, Germany
  • Christina Holtz-Bacha, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany
  • Karolina Koc-Michalska, Audencia Business School, France
  • Patrizia Laudatti, Université Côte d'Azur, France
  • Darren Lilleker, Bournemouth University, United Kingdom
  • Philippe J. Maarek, Université Paris Est - UPEC, France
  • Eric Maigret, Université Paris 3 Sorbonne Nouvelle, France
  • Pascal Marchand, Université de Toulouse 3, France
  • Lars Nord, Midwestern University, Sweden
  • Yves Palau, International School of Political Studies of Fontainebleau/UPEC, France
  • Nicolas Pelissier, Université Côte d'Azur, France
  • Brigitte Sebbah, Université Toulouse 3, France
  • Marina Villa, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Milano, Italy
  • Małgorzata Winiarska-Brodowska, Jagellon University, Poland

 

Colloque international, Nice, Université Côte d’Azur, EUR CREATES
29-30 juin 2022, Centre Universitaire Méditerranéen

« Comme un coup de tonnerre ». Quinze ans après que Lionel Jospin, ébranlé par sa défaite au premier tour de l'élection présidentielle de 2002 ait prononcé ces mots, ceux-ci ont retrouvé leur actualité en 2017, lorsque le parti socialiste s’est vu presque effacé de la carte de la politique française : son candidat Benoit Hamon, n'a totalisé que 6,35 % des suffrages exprimés lors du premier tour, après avoir été choisi par un processus de sélection de « primaires ouvertes » à tous les citoyens.

La victoire d’Emmanuel Macron en 2017 a le plus souvent été mise au crédit d'une campagne de communication politique très maîtrisée, alliée à l'habile exploitation d'un contexte politique délétère. Il avait ainsi pu contourner la courroie de transmission habituellement indispensable : le parti politique . En créant une structure militante ad hoc (« En Marche »), Emmanuel Macron avait réussi à bouleverser l'échiquier politique et à gagner l'élection, notamment grâce au soutien de l'équipe qui avait contribué, cinq ans plus tôt, à la victoire de François Hollande, en cartographiant la France électorale .

A l'automne 2021, l'élection présidentielle de 2022 semble placée sous le signe paradoxal de la certitude et de la confusion. Ainsi, à moins d’une énorme surprise, Emmanuel Macron apparaît éloigné du sort de son prédécesseur. Son bilan de mandat, pourtant grevé par la pandémie liée à la COVID-19, ne devrait pas l’empêcher de se représenter avec des chances d'être réélu. Quant à l’atmosphère diffuse de confusion, elle concerne plutôt des partis politiques qui ne semblent pas à ce jour avoir retrouvé leur capacité de remplir leur rôle. Six mois avant l'échéance électorale, la candidate socialiste Anne Hidalgo n'apparait guère en mesure de remettre en jeu sérieusement le parti qui l'a adoubée sans trop se soucier d'un accompagnement programmatique. De même, les Républicains en sont réduit à un simulacre de « primaires » dont l'électorat a été limité à celles et ceux… qui auront bien voulu payer à temps les 30 euros de l'adhésion au parti.  Enfin, le Rassemblement National, que l'on aurait pu penser voué au service de Marine le Pen, semble se recroqueviller au fur et à mesure de la baisse des intentions de votes pour celle-ci indiquée par les sondages. Pour ajouter à cette confusion, ceux-ci avancent à l'inverse la percée théorique d'Éric Zemmour, candidat non déclaré sans appartenance partisane précise et surfant, par une succession de provocations calculées, sur l'agitation médiatique des chaînes télévisées d'actualité en continu et des réseaux sociaux,

De ce fait, les mécanismes de la communication politique qui accompagne les processus électoraux, piliers de la démocratie, soulèvent de nombreuses questions. Ne faudrait-il pas contourner cette croyance du milieu politico-médiatique en la fiabilité des sondages, pourtant mise en cause de longue date , qui aboutit maintenant à retirer des candidatures (François Hollande en 2017) ou à en fabriquer d'autres ? Du coup, quel rôle assigner aux partis politiques, notamment en période électorale ? Faut-il les réinventer pour qu'ils reprennent leur fonction médiatrice pourtant indispensable dans une société que les réseaux sociaux semblent fragmenter de plus en plus, le nouveau "système médiatique hybride" exposé par Andrew Chadwick  mettant même en jeu la cohésion de certains pays, comme les États-Unis ou le Royaume-Uni ? Et comment, justement, mettre à profit l'essor des réseaux sociaux autrement qu'en promouvant des candidatures qui ne servent que leur personne ou des idées aux antipodes des idée fondatrices de nos démocraties, basées d'un côté et de l'autre de l'Atlantique sur les principes héritées d’un Siècle des Lumières qui semble bien lointain? Comment enfin surmonter la facilité d'un recours généralisé à un marketing politique favorisant de plus en plus la personnalisation des campagnes, oubliant les idées politiques, et remisant les programmes au profit d'arguments fondés sur le seul charisme audiovisuel des personnalités qui se présentent devant l'électorat ?

L'élection présidentielle de 2022 nourrit donc plus que jamais, au-delà de son résultat intrinsèque, la problématique de la réinvention du processus démocratique, une réalité que la France parait d'ailleurs partager avec nombre d'autres pays présumés partager les mêmes principes, à commencer par les États-Unis. 

Ce colloque sera l’occasion de faire un premier bilan réflexif des différentes campagnes de communication politique qui auront été mises en œuvre, tout d'abord en prémisse de l'élection présidentielle 2022, puis lors de cette consultation proprement dite, et d'essayer d'en inférer les moyens d'innovation des processus démocratiques.

Il s’agira pour les contributeurs d’analyser les stratégies de communication mobilisées et de leurs véhicules, de l’affiche aux meetings, des clips de campagne aux réseaux sociaux et autres dispositifs inventés par le marketing politique, en examinant leur adéquation à la bonne réalisation du processus essentiel de nos démocraties, la consultation du citoyen, en particulier en France lors du vote majeur, l'élection présidentielle

Les questions évoquées feront l'objet du colloque international de communication politique comparée qui se tiendra à Nice, les 28 et 29 juin 2022, à l’initiative du laboratoire Sic.Lab Méditerranée de l'Université Côte d’Azur (www.siclab.fr) avec le concours du Centre d'Etudes Comparées en Communication Politique et Publique (www.ceccopop.eu). Cette manifestation scientifique réunira chercheurs, enseignants-chercheurs et professionnels de la communication 
at the Centre Universitaire Méditerranéen, situé sur la Promenade des Anglais.

Ce colloque est organisé par Philippe J. Maarek, membre du Sic.Lab Méditerranée et Professeur à l'Université Paris Est Créteil (UPEC), directeur du CECCOPOP, ancien Président des Sections de Recherche en Communication Politique de l'IPSA et de l'IAMCR/AIERI et par Nicolas Pelissier, Professeur à l'Université Côte d’Azur, Directeur du Sic.Lab Méditerranée (UPR 3820), et directeur de la collection "Communication et Civilisation" chez L'Harmattan.

La manifestation sera bilingue, français-anglais. Les collègues désireux d'y présenter une communication sont invités à envoyer une demande de participation avant le 27 février 2022 à l’adresse mail suivante : ceccopop@gmail.com
 

Les propositions devront comporter un résumé/abstract de 250 à 500 mots (un ou deux feuillets) et un CV d'un feuillet. Elles feront l'objet d'une évaluation en double aveugle par les membres du Conseil Scientifique ci-dessous.

Direction  scientifique et organisation

Philippe J. Maarek, Université Paris Est – UPEC, Sic.Lab. Méditerranée (UPR 3820) et CECCOPOP

Nicolas Pelissier, Université Côte d'Azur et Sic.Lab. Méditerranée (UPR 3820)

Conseil scientifique

  • Paul Baines, University of Leicester, Grande-Bretagne
  • Camelia Beciu, Université de Bucarest, Roumanie
  • Donatella Campus, Università degli studi di Bergamo, Italie
  • Ann Crigler, University of Southern California, Etats-Unis
  • Eric Dacheux, Université de Clermont Auvergne, France
  • Alex Frame, Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté, Dijon,  France
  • Elizabeth Gardère, Université Bordeaux-Montaigne, France
  • Gilles Gauthier, Université de Laval, Canada
  • Lutz Hagen, Université Technique de Dresde, Allemagne
  • Christina Holtz-Bacha, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Allemagne
  • Karolina Koc-Michalska, Audencia Business School, France
  • Patrizia Laudatti, Université Côte d'Azur, France
  • Darren Lilleker, Bournemouth University, Royaume-Uni
  • Philippe J. Maarek, Université Paris Est - UPEC, France
  • Eric Maigret, Université Paris 3 Sorbonne Nouvelle, France
  • Pascal Marchand, Université de Toulouse 3, France
  • Lars Nord, Midwestern University, Suède
  • Yves Palau, Ecole Internationale d’Etudes Politiques de Fontainebleau/UPEC, France
  • Nicolas Pelissier, Université Côte d'Azur, France
  • Brigitte Sebbah, Université Toulouse 3, France
  • Marina Villa, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Milano, Italie
  • Małgorzata Winiarska-Brodowska, Jagellon University, Pologne